The Park

The name “Omaere” means “nature of the rainforest” in the Waorani.

The Park

The Omaere Ethnobotanical Park was one of the first ethnobotanical parks in all of Latin America. Ethnobotany is the study of the relations between cultures and the plants that surround them. Whether it is for medicinal, shelter, spiritual, or nutritional use, plants are a fundamental part of life for the indigenous peoples of the Amazon. Here in the Park you can visit traditional houses, where we teach about the Shuar and Waorani cultures and show some of their weapons and tools. We are located in Puyo, Ecuador, just a few minutes walk from the city center. Visit us in the Park; the entrance fee is $3 adults, $1.50 students, $0.50 children. (Each group should pay a minimum of $5.) Walks are guided and last 1-2 hours, depending on the interest of the visitor. The park is open every day except on Monday from 9am until 5pm. People in a big hurry can see some of the main points in half an hour. While on the trails, you will have a chance to feel the aroma of orchids, the taste of cinnamon, the spines of Cat’s Claw Vine, and be painted with Achotillo sap. Please call ahead to make a reservation if you need an English speaking guide.

The walk

You can discover a great diversity of useful plants along our trails during the guided walks. These may last one or two hours, depending on the time and interest of the vistors. Those who are in a rush may see the principal points in half an hour. The walks are led by native guides, biologists and volunteers. During the walk, you will see a large variety of edible, medicinal and cultural plants, together with those used to build homes. You will also learn about the Shuar and Waorani cultures, including their social life, arquitecture, arms and tools. There is also the opportunity to enjoy nature in general, in all its beauty.

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To Arrive

Omaere is located on the outskirts of the city of Puyo, along the “Paseo Turístico del Río Puyo,” a trail along the Rio Puyo, to the northeast of the city. To arrive, head out of town towards Tena, but before leaving town, turn right on Calle Cotapaxi at the “Coka” gas station. Follow this street  three blocks, to the Malecón del Río Puyo. where you will see statues of women of the seven ethnic groups of Pastaza Province. From here, cross the footbridge over the river, pass by the Hostal El Jardin and Hostal Flor de Canela, and continue 200 meters more until you see the entrance to Parque Etnobotánico Omaere, just before the second large bridge.

Please bring an umbrella or raincoat, because it rains frequently in Puyo. In fact, Puyo means cloud or mist  in the local Kichwa language.

mapa de ubicación del Parque Omaere.

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2 responses to “The Park

  • Journey to the Living Descendants of the Incas – Part 3 - Dreamtime Traveler

    […] Also, in Choa Choa, while they have access to safe drinking water via the government installed water system, they have no toilets and people go close to the river, which is a big health risk, particularly as it runs the risk of washing into the river and contaminating the communities downstream. The government is talking about installing flush toilets for them, however, all this will do is wash the untreated effluent directly into the river, as there is no treatment plan and it will definitely just go downstream then. Dad explained about a solution we know of that involves using dry toilets, which are completely inexpensive, where the output is simply and effectively recycled within months to be able to be used as soil or toilet cover. We actually learned of this solution from a man named Chris Canaday while we were in Ecuador, visiting The Omaere Ethnobotanical Park. […]

  • Journey to the Living Descendants of the Incas Part 3

    […] Also, in Choa Choa, while they have access to safe drinking water via the government installed water system, they have no toilets and people go close to the river, which is a big health risk, particularly as it runs the risk of washing into the river and contaminating the communities downstream. The government is talking about installing flush toilets for them, however, all this will do is wash the untreated effluent directly into the river, as there is no treatment plan and it will definitely just go downstream then. Dad explained about a solution we know of that involves using dry toilets, which are completely inexpensive, where the output is simply and effectively recycled within months to be able to be used as soil or toilet cover. We actually learned of this solution from a man named Chris Canaday while we were in Ecuador, visiting The Omaere Ethnobotanical Park. […]

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